Teaching

Courses

Graduate Student Mentor, Program in Values and Public Life, Princeton University Center for Human Values, 2018-2020.

“Political Theory”, Princeton University (Preceptor for Professor Anna Stilz), Spring 2020.

“Ethics & Public Policy”, Princeton University (Preceptor for Professors Stephen Macedo and Renee Bolinger), Fall 2019.

“Global Justice”, Princeton University (Preceptor for Professor Charles R. Beitz), Fall 2017.

“Cultures of War” (Teaching Assistant for Professor Umberto Ansaldo), School of Humanities, The University of Hong Kong, Fall 2013 & Fall 2014.

“The Life and Death of Languages” (Teaching Assistant for Professor Umberto Ansaldo), School of Humanities, The University of Hong Kong, Spring 2013 & Spring 2014.

“The Best Things in Life: A Philosophical Exploration” (Teaching Assistant for Professor Joseph Chan), Department of Politics & Public Administration, The University of Hong Kong, Spring 2015.

“Moral Controversies in Contemporary Society” (Teaching Assistant for Dr. James Gledhill), Department of Politics & Public Administration, The University of Hong Kong, Fall 2013.

“Moral Controversies in Contemporary Society” (Teaching Assistant for Professor Joseph Chan), Department of Politics & Public Administration, The University of Hong Kong, Fall 2012.

Sample Courses

Syllabi available upon request.

Historical Injustice and the Politics of Decolonization

From campaigns for reparations to calls to decolonize statues and symbols, the legacies of past injustice are very much present in our political and social life. Moreover, for Indigenous peoples and even many postcolonial societies, colonialism and neo-imperialism remain pressing concerns. In this course, we explore the moral and political questions raised by historic injustice, with a focus on race and empire. We approach these topics by studying the perspectives of Third World and Indigenous anticolonial thinkers, as well as engaging with work by contemporary political theorists and postcolonial thinkers. In exploring questions of anticolonial resistance, neo-imperialism, restitution, and reconciliation, we will consider the following questions: (1) What is “decolonization”, and how was it imagined and theorized by those who fought for it? (2) To what extent and in what ways have various forms of imperialism persisted to this day? (3) What, if any, moral and political obligations do beneficiaries of past and present structural injustice have? (4) To what extent is it possible to repair relations between historically privileged and oppressed groups, and what, if any, are the roles of reparations, reconciliation, and recognition in addressing colonial injustice?

Freedom and Equality

This survey course offers an overview of core texts in modern political theory, with a focus on ideas of freedom and equality. In Parts I and II, we read primary texts from thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Rawls, Marx, Douglass, Fanon, Beauvoir, and Du Bois. In Part III, we will consider how the values of freedom and equality relate to each other, by focusing on three political issues that remain controversial today: freedom of speech, economic redistribution, and group rights. In exploring questions of political obligation, slavery, capitalism, racial and gender oppression, and democracy, we will consider the following questions: (1) What is freedom, and is it possible to be free while living under social, political and economic institutions? (2) What is equality, and why is it valuable? What is required to attain it? (3) To what extent are the values of freedom and equality reconcilable, and how should we weigh them?